Don’t let anyone try to convince you that there is a Strat Plus, they just did not exist. It was owned by a former Fender employee who recently passed away. The strings, I am certain, were the original from 87, as they were rusty and hard to pull through the nut. I have owned ‘s of Strat Plus’, as well as helping s of people to identify their guitars. I also saw where Shell Pink was listed as an available color from Fender in color code 56 but not in any of the Strat Plus brochures. This is the oldest Strat Plus I have come across yet, as it came off the assembly-line July 27th, ! Scroll up to see John’s Custom Shop work log. The backs of the pickups do not even have any stickers with the part or patent numbers. Instead they are hand scribed most likely done by Jeff Lace when in high school.

Dating Fender Guitars

Bass 6 , to Typical wear on a ‘s Fender maple fingerboard. Fingerboard Material Maple fingerboard, s: This was the standard neck on all models until when the Jazzmaster was introduced with a rosewood fingerboard; the rest of the Fender models changed to rosewood fingerboards in mid Rosewood fingerboard, “Slab” Brazilian , to

(Ver. ) The Fender serial number decoder currently supports all documented MIA, MIJ, MIM, MIK and MII formats with the exception of Custom Shop, Relic and Reissue note that fender serial numbers tend to overlap by at least a year, and thereby the .

Tweet on Twitter Mention the subject of American acoustic guitars and one of the first names that will undoubtedly pop into your head will be C. A pretty impressive achievement. Bring up the topic of electrics, and Martin is hardly the first name of recall. Most coverage of the Martin brand is focused, quite rightly, on their substantial acoustic achievements. The primary starting point for information about Martin guitars is, of course, Martin Guitars: These pickups were the DeArmond humbuckers with chrome sides and a black center in a trapezoidal hole, large pole pieces along one side and smaller poles along the other.

The D E was a mahogany dreadnought with the neck pickup and a second bridge pickup. The typical Martin pickguard had the front point cut off and a notch in back to make room for the pickups rings. A three-way toggle was mounted on the upper treble bout. Controls included one volume and two tones, with the big plastic knobs. These began with prototype Around of these were produced. The D E was essentially the same as the D E except for a rosewood body, gold-finished pickups and Grover Roto-matic tuners.

D Es lasted from through

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If you’re looking for an easy to play guitar, the action doesn’t get any lower than this baby. Excellent value and quality that’s typical of Korea today. This model was only made in one small run so there aren’t many of these around – most of the Harm 3 models feature the cats eye f-hole in a semi-hollow design while this model was a limited edition production model that’s no longer available.

It features a solid archtop mahogany body, 22 fret maple set-neck with ebony fretboard and synthetic bone nut, side markers on the side of fretboard only, jumbo frets, flat The setup on this guitar is superb and the tone is warm and rich, very good choice for anything besides metal.

The History of Yamaha Guitars: Over Sixty Years of Innovation [Mark Kasulen, Matt Blackett] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Fascinating view of the world’s largest instrument maker. This is the first official comprehensive documentation of Yamaha guitars since their first prototypes were built more than 60 years ago.

It is the same guitar in fact that I played on a youtube video and that was featured in a blog post six years ago. It belonged to a collector of MK-related guitars who lives near my place, and when I learned that it was for sale I could not resist. With this blog post I want to focus on the Floyd Rose tremolo on such guitars. I must admit that I had never delved deep into Floyd Rose tremolos and their differences before, but with the arrival of this guitar I had a closer look at it. One striking feature of an original Floyd Rose are the protruding screws on the rear side of the bridge that lock the string ends.

I could not remember such long screws on the MK-1 so I had a closer look at some pictures of it again. Schaller tremolo on the original MK-1 Original Floyd Rose base plate made of steel Die-cast Schaller base plate Schaller is a German hardware manufacturer, well known for e. Some quick research told me that in fact Schaller was the manufacturer of the original Floyd Rose tremolos for a long time.

So these were made in Germany for Floyd Rose. In addition to the original Schaller-made FR tremolos various FR-licensed tremolos were available from several companies, and Schaller was one of these. In other words, they made the original tremolos for Floyd Rose, and they made a modified version featuring some improvements. Both are made in Germany.

1960’s Vintage Guitars

Our goal is to have the most comprehensive, up-to-date database listing possible but to achieve that we need your help! So please add your Tokai in the Registry because more information about these guitars is a benefit to us all. Not only can it help us determine when a specific guitar was manufactured, it can help us clarify which are Tokai Fender copies and those that fall under the Made in Korea serial number schemes.

Additionally, if something ever were to happen to your guitar stolen, damaged then the Registry would be helpful in providing key information for insurance purposes. For those of you that own a Tokai Love Rocks, check out the Tokai Gibson page for tips on how to identify manufacture date and model.

The V.C. Squier Company manufactured strings for violins, banjos, and was established in by Victor Carroll Squier in Battle Creek, , the company was acquired by , Squier became defunct as a manufacturer and a brand name for strings, as Fender opted to market its strings under the Fender brand name.

About Guitars Buying a new guitar is a considerable investment for most of us. An instrument is all about inspiration. You are the musician and the guitar is the tool you use to express your feelings and music. This has nothing to do with what models you choose or how much they cost. Some basic knowledge about the different wood types, neck and body profiles, pickups etc will help you in making the best choice. However, over the last decade or so, the MIMs has gotten a considerable face lift and the overall quality is very high.

In fact, the reason why they are cheaper, ha sless to do with quality but rather lower labour costs, cheaper type of laquer and apply methods etc. Japanese Fenders are considered to be above the Mexicans and perhaps even just as good as the US. In the 80s and early 90s, Japanese Fenders were well known for being superior to any other models and the quality is still top notch. Maple or rosewood necks? Neck wood and contour plays an important role in how the guitar sounds and how it feels to play.

Some like thick necks and some prefer a thinner contour.

Martin Electric Guitars

The first Fender solidbody model, the Esquire , lasted in name only from June to October This model name was replaced by the “Broadcaster”, which lasted in name only from the October to January All Broadcasters have truss rods, where many Esquires often have no truss rod.

The most important thing to keep in mind when dating a Fender is the highly modular nature of the designs. Like Henry Ford, part of Leo Fender’s genius was in .

I often get asked, how old is my Fender guitar? Most of the time this question can’t be answered specifically. The Fender numbers tell the story of the company over the years. Unfortunately, the serial number placement is sporadic and many ID numbers over lap between years and models. In many instances, there is no exact known date for a specific guitar.

That is why I decided to write this article. I want to help you understand how to tell the age of your Fender as well as any Fender you see. Fender like Gibson has been producing guitars for many years. Certain styles and colors have come and gone over the years, but there is no real obvious way to tell how old a Fender is other than the indentification number.

Unfortunately, Fender decided not to simply write the date of manufacture on the guitar. They decided that it would be easier to decipher the serial number code than just write the year on the guitar. I say this only joking. Most manufactures don’t actually write the production dates on the guitar in plain view. First let’s take a look at where to find ID numbers on a Fender guitar.

Vintage Ibanez Guitar Catalogs – 1971 through 2007

Like many words in our society, this one is oft used, seldom understood. Find an old Ibanez that is a copy of another, more familiar guitar? I have seen guitars go for much more than they are actually worth simply because the purchaser has fallen for the hype or actually didn’t know what constitutes a “lawsuit” model. Here is my attempt to clear up an urban legend, and, in the words of Chuck D.

The country was in the post-World War II music boom, and guitars were very popular. As the store grew Mr.

Introduction. For most collectors, pre-CBS (pre) Fender vintage guitars and amps are the desirable ones. Although CBS purchased Fender (officially) on January 3rd , it took some time till the guitars changed (though by mid , six months before CBS bought Fender, things were already “on the way down”).

Don’t let anyone try to convince you that there is a Strat Plus, they just did not exist. It was owned by a former Fender employee who recently passed away. The strings, I am certain, were the original from 87, as they were rusty and hard to pull through the nut. I have owned ‘s of Strat Plus’, as well as helping s of people to identify their guitars. I also saw where Shell Pink was listed as an available color from Fender in color code 56 but not in any of the Strat Plus brochures.

This is the oldest Strat Plus I have come across yet, as it came off the assembly-line July 27th, ! Scroll up to see John’s Custom Shop work log. The backs of the pickups do not even have any stickers with the part or patent numbers. Instead they are hand scribed most likely done by Jeff Lace when in high school. The numbers on the pickups indicate the order which they were manufactured! The soldering is very interesting, almost like they were trying to decide how to wire them up.

The Fender® New American Standard-(Japanese)